I'm Bettina. There is more stuff over there -> www.bettinajudd.com
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latinosexuality:

latinosexuality:

Revista Ebano latinoamerica (ebony latin america magazine) interviewed me in issue 18 in a 2 page spread and here are the results (it’s in spanish homies). 

all fotos taken by dreaminginspanish

so proud of this too! an international spanish language magazine focusing on LatiNegrxs worldwide and i was featured for my work in the field!!!!! now to get this up on my website!

Yaaas go Bi!!

(via lati-negros)

64,000

That’s how many black women are currently missing in America — but the media doesn’t seem to care (via micdotcom)

—Damn

(via upworthy)

remikanazi:

So Rihanna posts #FreePalestine, gets pushback from right wing racists, & deletes her post. Amar’e Stoudemire, Waka Flocka, Dwight Howard, Tyrese, Swizz Beatz, & Rihanna went with their conscience & posted about Palestine. Some got scared & deleted. These celeb posts point to something (even deleted ones). While their posts aren’t transformational and surely don’t smash apartheid, it highlights a slight shift in discourse. Another issue, I don’t find it useful to flood feeds & bash these celebs for deleted posts. We know what they thought before they were harassed. Let’s build on our end. Look how Talib Kweli was positively engaged. He listened, asked questions, reflected, cancelled & continues to speak up for justice in Palestine.

remikanazi:

So Rihanna posts #FreePalestine, gets pushback from right wing racists, & deletes her post. Amar’e Stoudemire, Waka Flocka, Dwight Howard, Tyrese, Swizz Beatz, & Rihanna went with their conscience & posted about Palestine. Some got scared & deleted. These celeb posts point to something (even deleted ones). While their posts aren’t transformational and surely don’t smash apartheid, it highlights a slight shift in discourse. Another issue, I don’t find it useful to flood feeds & bash these celebs for deleted posts. We know what they thought before they were harassed. Let’s build on our end. Look how Talib Kweli was positively engaged. He listened, asked questions, reflected, cancelled & continues to speak up for justice in Palestine.

(via doncheftw)

And then I watched McCarthy’s character, Megan—clad in orthopedic sandals and a boxy, shape-obscuring pant-and-Guy Fieri bowling-shirt combo—look at a random man at a party and loudly announce that she was “going to climb that like a tree.” The audience erupted in laughter but I pursed my mouth. This still wasn’t as painful as the moment later in the film when the titular characters are on a flight to Vegas and Megan flirts with her cringing male seatmate by slapping her stomach and offering him access to her undercarriage. This gag shares an unspoken punchline with that misogynist old chestnut about rolling a fat woman in flour and seeking out the wet spot: that fat women’s bodies are inherently disgusting, especially when displaying sexual desire, and courting desire in turn. Visibility alone was no longer enough. I’m left longing for stories about fat women that don’t tumble off the wrong side of that thin tightrope between laughing with and laughing at.
blacksandbooks:

The Curse of Caste; Or the Slave Bride: A Rediscovered African American Novel
Julia C. Collins
ISBN 0195301609
In 1865, The Christian Recorder, the national newspaper of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, serialized The Curse of Caste; or The Slave Bride, a novel written by Mrs. Julia C. Collins, an African American woman living in the small town of Williamsport, Pennsylvania. The first novel ever published by a black American woman, it is set in antebellum Louisiana and Connecticut, and focuses on the lives of a beautiful mixed-race mother and daughter whose opportunities for fulfillment through love and marriage are threatened by slavery and caste prejudice. The text shares much with popular nineteenth-century women’s fiction, while its dominant themes of interracial romance, hidden African ancestry, and ambiguous racial identity have parallels in the writings of both black and white authors from the period.
Begun in the waning months of the Civil War, the novel was near its conclusion when Julia Collins died of tuberculosis in November of 1865. In this first-ever book publication of The Curse of Caste; or The Slave Bride, the editors have composed a hopeful and a tragic ending, reflecting two alternatives Collins almost certainly would have considered for the closing of her unprecedented novel. In their introduction, the editors offer the most complete and current research on the life and community of an author who left few traces in the historical record, and provide extensive discussion of her novel’s literary and historical significance. Collins’s published essays, which provide intriguing glimpses into the mind of this gifted but overlooked writer, are included in what will prove to be the definitive edition of a major new discovery in African American literature. Its publication contributes immensely to our understanding of black American literature, religion, women’s history, community life, and race relations during the era of United States emancipation.

blacksandbooks:

The Curse of Caste; Or the Slave Bride: A Rediscovered African American Novel

Julia C. Collins

ISBN 0195301609

In 1865, The Christian Recorder, the national newspaper of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, serialized The Curse of Caste; or The Slave Bride, a novel written by Mrs. Julia C. Collins, an African American woman living in the small town of Williamsport, Pennsylvania. The first novel ever published by a black American woman, it is set in antebellum Louisiana and Connecticut, and focuses on the lives of a beautiful mixed-race mother and daughter whose opportunities for fulfillment through love and marriage are threatened by slavery and caste prejudice. The text shares much with popular nineteenth-century women’s fiction, while its dominant themes of interracial romance, hidden African ancestry, and ambiguous racial identity have parallels in the writings of both black and white authors from the period.


Begun in the waning months of the Civil War, the novel was near its conclusion when Julia Collins died of tuberculosis in November of 1865. In this first-ever book publication of The Curse of Caste; or The Slave Bride, the editors have composed a hopeful and a tragic ending, reflecting two alternatives Collins almost certainly would have considered for the closing of her unprecedented novel. In their introduction, the editors offer the most complete and current research on the life and community of an author who left few traces in the historical record, and provide extensive discussion of her novel’s literary and historical significance. Collins’s published essays, which provide intriguing glimpses into the mind of this gifted but overlooked writer, are included in what will prove to be the definitive edition of a major new discovery in African American literature. Its publication contributes immensely to our understanding of black American literature, religion, women’s history, community life, and race relations during the era of United States emancipation.

(via poc-creators)